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  1. 30 of 30 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Betty Crocker Gluten Free Cookbook, October 26, 2012
    By 
    Cathy

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    Betty Crocker’s Gluten Free cookbook is probably the most “normal” selection of Gluten Free recipes out of the several Gluten Free cookbooks I’ve tried. It has many easy and tasty recipes using the Gluten Free Bisquick mix for several foods. I didn’t think I would ever have fried chicken again but there was a great recipe for a coating. Have fixed several of the dishes in here and love the Betty Crocker cake, brownie and chocolate chip cookie mixes as well for cheaper Gluten Free desserts than you can buy in the stores.
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  2. 66 of 72 people found the following review helpful
    2.0 out of 5 stars
    A lot of packaged ingredients, and a whole lot of fat, April 19, 2012
    By 
    Sydney M (Eastern Panhandle, WV) –

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    This review is from: Betty Crocker Gluten-Free Cooking (Betty Crocker Cooking) (Paperback)
    This may well be the right cookbook for someone suddenly forced to cook gluten-free after relying on mixes and convenience foods, or someone who is simply pressed for time. It’s full of recipes are marked “quick” and/or “easy”, many using Bisquick, Betty Crocker cake or cookie mixes, and other packaged convenience foods (e.g., frozen vegetables, frozen hash brown potatoes). You can probably tell if it’s for you by looking at recipes for the six items featured in pictures on the front cover – two made with Betty Crocker mixes (a cake with 490 calories and 25 grams of fat per serving, and a cupcake with 330 calories and 13 grams fat) and three made with Bisquick (pizza – 230 calories, 14 grams fat per slice; oven-baked chicken (420 calories, 21 grams fat per serving); and pancakes (430 calories, 2.5 grams fat per serving – one of the cookbooks relatively few entries marked “low-fat”). The remaining item pictured is white sandwich bread (120 calories, 4.5 grams fat per slice – also marked “low-fat”), made from scratch using tapioca, white rice, sorghum, garbanzo & fava bean flours plus potato starch and both xanthan and guar gums. That’s a somewhat higher proportion of recipes made from mixes than you’ll find in the cookbook as a whole – but the variety of flours used in recipes made from scratch is not atypical. On the plus side, the cookbook offers recipes for a few items not always found in gluten-free cookbooks – not just chicken fingers (dredged in Bisquick), but also soft pretzels and two kinds of crackers (sesame, poppyseed).

    Since I’m at a stage of my life when I have plenty of time to cook and really enjoy it, I have never gotten into using cake and other mixes, and both my husband and I are on low-fat diets, I knew just leafing through the book it wasn’t for me. Too bad. I do use Betty Crocker’s Low-Fat, Low-Cholesterol Cooking Today, Betty Crocker’s Diabetes Cookbook: Everyday Meals, Easy as 1-2-3and even the old Betty Crocker’s International Cookbook now and then, so I was really looking forward to this gluten-free cookbook. (Granted, I usually turn to Elizabeth Barbone’s Easy Gluten-Free Baking or How to Cook Gluten-Free: Over 150 Recipes That Really Work for baked goods or other items using flours – she achieves great results using fewer flours and no guar gum.) Aside from the fat content, the Betty Crocker cookbooks I use avoid another really annoying habit of this new gluten-free cookbook – promoting General Mills brands shamelessly at every opportunity. Recipes specify brand names (without the “or other gluten-free product” common in other bookbooks) not only for Bisquick and Betty Crocker cake and cookie mixes, but also for Rice Chex cereal, Yoplait yogurt, Betty Crocker frostings and Potato Bud instant potatoes, El Paso salsa, Progresso chicken broth and canned beans, Green Giant frozen vegetables, Muir Glen canned tomatoes, and Cascadia Farms apple juice. I found it very annoying, and hope anyone new to gluten-free cooking quickly learns that while some things (like chicken broth) should be checked over carefully because they may contain gluten, there is little reason to specify specific brands for others (like frozen vegetables – not that one shouldn’t always, for everything, read the label before purchase, just in case).

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  3. 13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    Met expectations, May 24, 2012
    By 
    Patty RJ (Oak Creek, WI) –

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    This review is from: Betty Crocker Gluten-Free Cooking (Betty Crocker Cooking) (Paperback)
    If you’re looking for a comprehensive cookbook of recipes that you can find from the Betty Crocker website, this is a pretty good option. Most of the recipes are very easy and incorporate prepared mixes. Lots of good ideas and pretty pictures here! I was disappointed that there weren’t more snack recipes made with Chex (like the website), but overall not bad. My other disappointment was the use of bean flours in the recipes for flour mixes. I don’t like the aftertaste of bean flours, and therefore never use them, so I won’t be making any of the recipes with these mixes. Although this will not be my “go-to” gluten free cookbook, I think it’s a good buy and a nice addition to my GF cookbook library.
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