3 Comments

  1. 354 of 364 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Same on-target Nutritarian wisdom: some new, much repeated, May 28, 2014
    By 
    A. Friedman (Northern California, USA) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    Verified Purchase(What’s this?)

    I’ve read dozens of nutrition books, and Dr Joel Fuhrman has become far & away my most trusted source. Read ANY of his books! Superimmunity is still my favorite. This one is more focused on weight loss (including psychological aspects) and slightly less specifically about the diseases of affluence that kill most of us, but it is more of the same facts & same message to eat copious quantities of greens & other whole vegetables, ample berries, nuts, seeds, & legumes, little or no animal products (even lowering his limits in this newest book), moderate INTACT whole grains, no sweeteners (caloric nor artificial), little or no processed foods, and zero trans fats. It’s not the macronutrients, but the micronutrients!

    In this latest book, I particularly liked his criticisms of other diets. He attacks the Atkins/Paleo crowd for too much animal protein and too few nuts, seeds, & beans–just what I felt about Good Calories Bad Calories and The Calorie Myth–although the latter acknowledges Fuhrman and follows his lead in pushing for large amounts of phytonutrient-rich non-starchy vegetables.

    In fact, Fuhrman covered every one of my concerns with Jonathan Bailor’s popular new (low carb high meat) book The Calorie Myth (which is still well worth reading AFTER Fuhrman). Bailor really pushes soy protein powders but here Fuhrman explains some concerns about protein powders (although not mentioning the hexane used in extraction).

    It may take 20+ years for the heightened levels of IGF-1 in Paleo dieters to surface as detectable cancer, but watch out! Fuhrman agrees with the low-carb concepts, but instead of falling into the meat trap, he incorporates low-carbs into a much broader health scenario (with protein from greens & beans). He still prefers algal supplements to fish for EPA & DHA, and he advises wild fish because of contaminants like dioxin in farmed fish.

    This time, he goes into a bit more detail about carbohydrates, soy isolates, meat, and especially dairy raising the IGF-1 hormone, resulting in fat, cancer, atherosclerosis, hypertension, aging, and any monster you care to name. Even the Calorie Restriction Society turns out to have significantly higher IGF-1 than vegans.

    Fuhrman attacks the anti-wheat crowd (Grain Brain & Wheat Belly) for confusing flour with intact grains. He attacks the USDA for just about everything–too much meat, dairy, & grain, not enough vegetables, nuts, & beans. (Really, it’s too much politics and corporate influence.) He attacks aspects of the Mediterranean diet (pasta & olive oil). He even politely indicts the China Study / vegan crowd for too little plant fat (avocado, coconut, olives, nuts, & seeds). He is right on target!

    Another topic now covered in a bit more detail is the danger of yo-yo dieting and how regained weight tends to be the more dangerous visceral fat (belly/organs) rather than subcutaneous fat.

    He reduces his acceptance of eggs on pg 146 stating, “a 23 percent increased death rate from those eating more than one egg a day”, but I’m pretty sure the death rate is 100% (just like taxes), even for vegans. Besides, if you divide us into ovophiles & ovophobes, the egg-eating crowd surely also consumes more pepperoni pizza & ice cream, so such correlations, the backbone of much nutritional advice, should not be swallowed too gullibly.

    (Fortunately) There’s nothing remarkably different from his other books, yet they’re all worth reading. In this one he adds further information, clarification, case histories, and recipes, and it’s at least as good as the others. Now he elevates the importance of raw onions & cooked mushrooms. He explains that onions must be chopped before cooking to break cell walls to release the alliinase enzyme for chemical conversions, just like the enzyme myrosinase in cruciferous vegies that converts glucosides to isothiocyanates. (My hypothesis, if you like your roasted garlic whole, [as with cruciferous] is to eat a little raw green onions with any cooked allium so that the alliinase enzyme is reintroduced.)

    Some reviewers complain that this book is just a repeat of prior books, and while it is mostly that, why not read this now instead of re-reading the older ones. Fuhrman is worth re-reading.

    Some reviewers object to the title because this is “yet another diet”, although it is more of an informed lifestyle. Of course you don’t count calories or watch the scale, but I also completely ignore the mentions of portion sizes, percentages, and schedules and just eat by the concepts (but do correlate your carbohydrate intake to the caloric demands anticipated after the meal). The title helps make this the perfect gift to several fad-diet yo-yo-weight friends for whom I hope it is The Last Diet. (But such a title might sound too fatal.)

    The appendix is a suitably cautious review of supplements, advising the possibility of a few like…

    Read more

    Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

    Was this review helpful to you? Yes
    No

  2. 378 of 390 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Best book by Dr. Fuhrman yet!!, March 25, 2014
    By 
    M. Foley (Saranac Lake, N.Y.) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    I have read Dr. Fuhrman’s, Eat To Live, Eat For Health and Super Immunity. This book BY FAR is his best one yet. I am almost done with it. Chapter two is titled diet myths exposed. I loved his take on SAD (standard American diet), Paleo Diet, Mediterranean Diet, Wheat Belly Diet and some low-fat fallacies. That chapter alone is worth the price of the book. But the best chapter by far is where he explains “The Plan” in chapter six. He details this eating plan so anyone can get it. I call Dr. Fuhrman the “salad man.”
    What makes this book good also is the testimonies of those who regained their health by eating this way. And the recipes in the back are an extra bonus. So if you are looking at any of his books—start with this one first. By far his best.
    Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

    Was this review helpful to you? Yes
    No

  3. 190 of 199 people found the following review helpful
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    The “Friendlier” Version of His Old Classic, Eat To Live – With a bit more “trust me” thrown in for readability, August 11, 2014
    By 
    HatchMan (USA) –

    Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    Deciding between Eat To Live or The End of Dieting:

    In this book, compared with his others, it’s a lot easier to read, but it’s a bit more “trust the doctor” versus laying out a massive scientific pile of evidence. So if you are a born skeptic, get Eat to Live. If you accept that veggies are good for you, then skip that and just get to “follow the good doctor’s advice” of this book.

    I also felt Eat To Live is a harsher diet… it’s very, very strict, and if followed to the letter, will result in faster weight loss and health benefits. It’s just really, really hard. In The End of Dieting, he loosens up a bit, and it may take you 3-4 times longer to get the results, but will be easier going there.

    If you have a major medical issue and are facing heart surgery, for example, get Eat To Live and take the tough medicine.

    If you just have 20-30 pounds to lose or want to just eat healthier to avoid FUTURE health issues, then go easy on yourself and do The End of Dieting.

    About the content:

    If you read enough diet/nutrition books, you start to ask youself? What is common knowledge and what is new here? In general, folks, NEW IS BAD.

    For lasting health with few side effects, find the “common ground” of all diets that have worked in the past.

    For Fuhrman, his diet is based on common sense and what we all know in the back of our minds to be true. We need to eat less meat and cheese, and a lot more veggies (and fruit, just under some reasonable control).

    What this book does however, is give you the vast science behind it so you can justify the fact that, let’s be honest, steamed asparagus is NEVER going to taste as good as a donut or peanut butter and jelly sandwich.

    So I absolutely believe that of all the diet books out there, all of them, this one is the healthiest. It’s just not easy.

    Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

    Was this review helpful to you? Yes
    No

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *